Question: How Do You Check Your Lungs With A Stethoscope?

Can a stethoscope detect lung problems?

Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased or absent breath sounds, and abnormal breath sounds.

Absent or decreased sounds can mean: Air or fluid in or around the lungs (such as pneumonia, heart failure, and pleural effusion).

How do you check chest congestion with a stethoscope?

Your doctor will probably use a stethoscope to listen to the back and front of your chest to check for any crackling or rattling sounds. They may also tap your chest and listen to the sound that is produced. If your lungs are filled with fluid, they will produce a different sound compared with normal, healthy lungs.

What can a doctor hear with a stethoscope?

Your doctor will use a stethoscope to hear your heartbeat. The opening and closing of your heart’s valves make a “lub dub” noise. The doctor can check your heart and valve health and hear your heart’s rate and rhythm by listening to those sounds.

Can a doctor diagnose pneumonia with a stethoscope?

Your doctor may diagnose pneumonia based on your medical history and the results from a physical exam. He or she will listen to your lungs with a stethoscope. Your doctor may also do some tests, such as a chest X-ray or a blood test.

Where do you put the stethoscope to listen to your lungs?

Listening over clothing, or even a lot of chest hair, can sound like fluid in the lungs. Remember that during inspiration, the lungs only go down to the level of approximately the mid-back. When listening on the back, place the stethoscope head between and below the scapulae, not over them.

What does healthy lungs sound like?

Normal findings on auscultation include: Loud, high-pitched bronchial breath sounds over the trachea. Medium pitched bronchovesicular sounds over the mainstream bronchi, between the scapulae, and below the clavicles. Soft, breezy, low-pitched vesicular breath sounds over most of the peripheral lung fields.

Why do doctors listen to your back with a stethoscope?

We use our stethoscope to listen to your lungs in different places on your chest and back, checking for things like infection or fluid in the lungs, or wheezing, which is caused by an abnormal tightness the tubes that bring air into the lungs (called bronchi).